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Americans are coming round to the joy of spicy food, and this is evidenced by the amazing growth of Indian food establishments over the past few years. According to CNBC, the famously spice-laden cuisine has become one of America’s favorites. There has seldom been a better time to create your own restaurant with signature spicy dishes, but creating your own food business is a decision that can’t be taken lightly.

The fundamentals

A food industry business can be difficult to run – just like all other businesses. On the positive side, food establishments are actually less likely to fail than new businesses in other industries, with the average failure rate dropping by 12% each year, according to business statisticians Fortunly. While food is your passion, it’s important to run the business in a diligent fashion. This means securing supply chains (especially important when it comes to food cooked with less common spices), learning how to manage finances, and crucially, covering yourself. There are many areas of risk in the food business, from cooking, to staff, to accident, and it’s crucial to have effective food and beverage business insurance to cover every eventuality.

Building an identity

Cooking predominantly with exotic herbs and spices will already given you a unique angle for your business. Building this into a clear brand is the next challenge. Take inspiration from success stories: Levi Roots, a British entrepreneur, used the unique culture that helped to develop his Reggae Reggae Sauce, a spice-focused barbecue/jerk sauce, to create an entire marketing campaign. Focus on your unique dishes and ideas.

Branching out

The spices that you use in your food will likely be initially restricted to one cuisine. However, there is a huge amount of crossover. Many of the flavor profiles you’ll see used in Mexican cuisine, with cumin and cilantro dominant, can also be found in India. Similarly, the rich onion, tomato and egg dishes found in North Africa use cumin, paprika, cayenne pepper and nutmeg – flavors found in central Europe, in Hungary and Romania. Always be on the look out to see how your meals can branch out and encompass another region’s flavors.

In the modern day, a restaurant focusing on intense, spicy flavors can expect success across the board. Public palates are increasingly leaning towards food that makes you think, and any restaurant catering to this will be set to succeed. To do well, simply keep it fresh.